Jamaica dominates 100m track as Bolt and Thompson triumph

The world’s fastest man, Usain Bolt, became the first athlete to win three Olympic 100m titles by beating American Justin Gatlin to gold on Super Sunday at Rio 2016.

As the Jamaican sent the stadium into a frenzy once again – chants of his name ringing through the crowd – Elaine Thompson was also still celebrating winning the women’s 100m gold; stealing Shelley-Ann Fraser-Pryce’s title.

Jamaica once again dominated the track, with USA only managing silver in both the men’s and women’s 100m. Justin Gatlin took silver as the American was 0.08 seconds behind Bolt’s 9.81, with Canada’s Andre de Grasse in third.

Bolt later said, “Somebody said I can become immortal. Two more medals to go and I can sign off. Immortal”.

De Grasse took bronze in a personal best of 9.91, ahead of Bolt’s Jamaican team-mate Yohan Blake.

British sprinters CJ Ujah and James Dasaolu were eliminated in the semi-finals.

In the women’s final which took place on Super Saturday, Thompson won the gold medal in a time of 10.71 seconds, with American Tori Bowie finishing second in 10.83.

Fraser-Pryce was attempting to become the first athlete to win the 100m at three successive Games, but she was forced to settle for bronze.

Jamaica’s global dominance on the track is broad and deep, both male and female, and Bolt is looking to be the first athlete to complete the triple treble, should he win the 200m final and 4x100m relay at Rio.

It certainly was a Super Sunday after Michael Johnson’s 17-year 400m record was smashed by South African Wayde van Niekerk with a world record time of 43.03; taking home gold in the men’s event.

After a surge in gold medal wins in cycling, rowing, gymnastics, dressage and on the track, Britain rose up the medal table above China to second behind USA. Britain’s gold medal tally currently stands at 16; ten behind USA and just one above China.

TNT Sport

Photo Credit: (Bolt) Pixeltoo – (Thompson) Sports Zone

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